Log In | Become a Member | Contact Us


Market Intelligence for Printing and Publishing

Connect on Twitter | Facebook | LinkedIn

Featured:     drupa 2016     European Coverage     Production Inkjet Analysis     2016 Business Conditions Report

Thought Leadership Video Series

Jim Chadwick of Wild Apple on the importance of color consistency

Published on November 29, 2012

Jim Chadwick of Wild Apple in Vermont talks to Cary Sherburne about their business of reproducing artwork and the importance of color management and control.

Cary Sherburne: Hi, Cary Sherburne, Senior Editor at WhatTheyThink.com and I'm pleased to be here with Jim Chadwick who is with Wild Apple in Vermont.

Jim Chadwick: Yes, pleased to be here.

Cary Sherburne: It’s probably a little cold up there right now.

Jim Chadwick: Yep, it’s leaf peeper time.

Cary Sherburne: And maple syrup time is coming.

Jim Chadwick: Yes.

Cary Sherburne: Well tell me a little bit about Wild Apple.

Jim Chadwick: Well, Wild Apple is an art publisher and started in the owner’s bathroom in their house and migrated to their barn and eventually we have a full warehouse now.

Cary Sherburne: And so when you talk about reproducing artwork what do you do? I mean, give me an example of some applications that you’re doing.

Jim Chadwick: Well we contract with artists and we have designers in-house as well. And they’ll create digital art or we’ll do high resolution photography. And that’s sort of the core business. We also have a licensing division. As we create digital files creating art we contract the rights for other companies to use the digital files on products.

Cary Sherburne: Okay. And for artists, of course, the printed output, the color quality, the way it looks on the paper, the choice of the stock - all of that is really, really important to them.

Jim Chadwick: Yes, we have very high end color management internally from digital photography to our house-in proofers to our alpha devices, our 29-inch offset press and, of course the MGI DP60 Pro. We find color consistency between all the products pretty good to match.

Cary Sherburne: That’s great. And how do you decide whether it’s going to be offset or digital?

Jim Chadwick: The DP60 allows us to do more test marketing approaches for certain framers. Our customers are framer and so we might do short runs that they’ll do test marketing in a retail outlet like Target or JC Penney, etc.

Cary Sherburne: Michaels maybe?

Jim Chadwick: Yeah. So that product allows us to run 100, 150 of certain quantities. One of the big features of the DP60 was that it does 1236 full bleed. It’s a very popular size press.

Cary Sherburne: Okay. Yeah, that’s a lot bigger than…

Jim Chadwick: That was one of the key reasons we purchased that machine.

Cary Sherburne: Now I understand that you also do self-maintenance on that machine.

Jim Chadwick: Yes, our operator is pretty good at that sort of thing and has been in the business a long time and does very well with that.

Cary Sherburne: Hopefully you don’t have to do it too often, right?

Jim Chadwick: No, I mean, we haven’t seen a technician for months on that machine.

Cary Sherburne: Oh my gosh, that’s great.

Jim Chadwick: Yes. We’ve been very lucky with it.

Cary Sherburne: And so where do you see this going? I mean, do you see more and more people bringing you digital art or are you seeing more photography or how is that changing?

Jim Chadwick: More and more it’s becoming, for us, it’s being more generated internally. When we hire an artist we pay royalties so anything we do internally, of course, we could make more money off that.

Cary Sherburne: Sure, of course. And so what kind of paper stocks are you using? Are there any limitations? You know, because sometimes between digital and offset you’ve got different limitations. Do you see limitations on that?

Jim Chadwick: No, we use an 80 lb. dull cover. Basically we’re doing very high end posters, single sided, four color. And we use the same substrate for the digital device as well as on our press. It’s the same paper.

Cary Sherburne: That’s great. It sounds like a really, really fun business.

Jim Chadwick: Yes. It’s very fun there.

Cary Sherburne: And a great place to live, Vermont.

Jim Chadwick: Right.

Cary Sherburne: Terrific. Thank you.

 

Post a Comment

To post a comment Log In or Become a Member, doing so is simple and free

 

 

Recent Videos

 

Video preview: Time Well Spent, Advice Well Received

Time Well Spent, Advice Well Received

Published: May 27, 2016

The main criterion for presentations at trade association meetings is relevance. Printer Tom Mercier gives high marks for relevance to the sessions he attended at the recent Epicomm Experience gathering, where mergers and acquisitions, sales development, and personnel recruitment were among the many pertinent subjects under discussion. Mercier also thinks that the success of the conference bodes well for Epicomm's merger with IDEAlliance, which he calls "a win-win for print, mailing, and everything else we do."

 

Video preview: Frank Visits Massachusetts College of Art & Design in Boston

Frank Visits Massachusetts College of Art & Design in Boston

Published: May 27, 2016

Frank visits with Al Gowan at the TJ Lyons antique font collection at Massachusetts College of Art & Design in Boston.

 

Video preview: Commodity Printers:

Commodity Printers: "They're Ruining the Business for the People Who Love It"

Published: May 26, 2016

If a verbal broadside is what it will take to get the attention of a complacent printing industry, then a verbal broadside is what Warren Werbitt is prepared to deliver. Here, he asks why the industry doesn't do more to keep itself from being devalued by people who ought to be saluting printers for bringing "life to the world." He also wants to see more young people taking part both at the company level and at industry conferences and trade shows.

 

Video preview:

"The Best Way to Predict the Future Is to Create It"

Published: May 25, 2016

So advises John Cassidy of Duplicates INK, who explored creative strategies in a highly rated presentation called "Cross the Line and Disrupt Your Market" at the recent Epicomm Experience conference. Cassidy believes that innovation is still possible even in mature industries like printing. Printers can achieve it, he says, by asking their top customers two questions: "What do you want more of out of me? What can I do to be a 10?"

 

Video preview: Epicomm Experience: a Participant's Review

Epicomm Experience: a Participant's Review

Published: May 24, 2016

Malia Lageman, who traveled all the way from Honolulu to Savannah to take part in Epicomm Experience, found that the program made the long trip more than worthwhile. Here, she talks about the networking opportunities it gave her, especially with exhibiting vendors; the high energy of the speakers she listened to; and the ideas she gained during conference-related plant tours.

 

Video preview:

"It Clicked": Ken Garner and David Steinhardt Review the Epicomm - IDEAlliance Merger

Published: May 23, 2016

On July 1, the trade associations Epicomm and IDEAlliance will go forward as one under the IDEAlliance name. Ken Garner and David Steinhardt, respectively executive vice president and president/CEO of the combined organization, talk about how bringing the groups together will enhance the value of membership for the more than 3,000 companies now under the IDEAlliance banner. They say that the first positive outcome is the launch of a certification program for mailing professionals.

 

View More Videos

 

Become a Member

Join the thousands of printing executives who are already part of the WhatTheyThink Community.

Copyright © 2016 WhatTheyThink. All Rights Reserved