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Andy Tribute: Memjet - The latest disruptive technology

Published on February 9, 2011

Andy Tribute looks at the impact of disruptive technologies on the printing and publishing industries, and discusses how Memjet's inkjet technology will be the next disruptive technology to impact on the industry.




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By frank shuman on Feb 09, 2011

Great insights into what the digital future may look like, makes the the imagination run...


By Clint Bolte on Feb 09, 2011

What do their patents suggest is the reason for this extraordinary advancement in speed?

Simply scaling the printheads as Andy describes certainly opens up different market/product applications, but does not really explain the speed enhancements that much.



By Gordon Pritchard on Feb 09, 2011

Love the ominous sound of thunder in the background punctuating some of Andy's comments.

Unfortunately Memjet has updated their website and as a result their old press releases and tech descriptions are no longer available. However, since the technology has been around for over 5 years, iIs it possible that Memjet technology is already being used in a few of the major vendor's digital presses but is being kept "under the hood?"


By Fadel Iskander on Feb 09, 2011

I doubt that the technology used in the Memjet is the same as one used in either the hp/PB T200/T300 or the Kodak Prosper.

The colors are vibrant whereas they are never vibrant in the super highspeed multi-million dollar production inkjet presses.

It is impressive. I'd like to get a little one of those for the house. Andy says they are going for about $600!!!!

Amazing indeed.
Disruptive for sure....
Proveded they can really integrate all of theses heads together and still produce output that can be trusted for transactional documents within the next 18-months).


By Andrew Tribute on Feb 09, 2011

Gordon and Fadel

I can assure you that none of the high-speed continuous feed print engines currently announced in the market use Memjet print heads. My belief is that Memjet has linked five print heads across the web and five print heads inline, but as yet have not combined the two. This is for Memjet's own developments, but I cannot comment on what might be under development from as yet unknown Memjet OEMs.


By Jan Eskildsen on Feb 10, 2011

The reason for changing the web site, which happened just a few days ago, and after the announcement of a Lenovo printer with Memjet techology, is a harbinger for a significant announcement.
Well, that's what I think... :-)


By Chuck Gehman on Feb 10, 2011

Very little actually disappears completely from the web.

If you want to look at their old website content, and the links to old press releases, etc., go to The Wayback Machine, at http://www.archive.org/web/web.php

Enter their web address, and voila, you will see several choices of their old web sites to view.


By Brian Lawler on Feb 10, 2011

I agree with Andy that Memjet is a truly disruptive technology. I have been a follower of Memjet for years, and now have a Memjet printer in my lab in testing.

This technology is absolutely amazing, and much like the HP Edgeline technology that came to market several years ago, it seeds the industry with the tools needed to put ink-jet heads almost anywhere in the printing process.

Keep an eye on this technology, as pretty soon it will be on a desktop or a wide-format printer (or a web press) near you.


By Thomas Schildgen on Feb 10, 2011

Andy Tribute is correct in classifying Memjet as a disruptive technology that will truly have an impact in many market sectors, and displacing other existing production processes. Further, we are seeing new technology being integrated at a faster rate than ever before. Memjet has an impressive record of registered patents during the past decade. One could only speculate on the industry partnerships that Memjet is capable of developing. Thomas Schildgen – Arizona State University


By Drew Court on Feb 15, 2011

I had the privilege of getting right up close to memjet technology here where their R&D headqauarters are in Sydney, Australia (Memjet uses Silverbrook Technologies' patented technologies). Apart from the monolithic MEMS printhead with over 73,000 nozzles, they developed their own chip to drive it and it is hugely powerful. Andy is right, create arrays, drive them with powerful front-ends of the kind we already see in HV Inkjet and you have a phenomenal potential for wider-web and up to maybe 150 metres/minute. Droplet size of less than 2pl! 1600x800dpi - Beat that? There is already a commercial label press using Memjet, also made in Australia. You can see it here:


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