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European Spider Adopts Coloreel Thread-Coloring Technology (April Fools 2019 Edition)

Monday, April 01, 2019

Press release from the issuing company

One member of Araneus diadematus, commonly known as the European garden spider, recently announced that it has adopted Coloreel’s revolutionary thread-coloring technology for its day-to-day web production. The spider uses an elaborate web woven from a proteinaceous silk extruded from its spinnarets to catch prey, as well as protect itself and its eggs from predators. The spider plans to use the Coloreel technology to “jazz up my web a bit,” she said. Spider webs have been generally white or translucent since the Early Devonian period, and the spider felt it was time for a change. “I’ve been waiting for evolution to add some color to my web production, but that’s just taking too long,” said the spider. “So when I read about the Coloreel technology on WhatTheyThink, I knew I had to investigate further.”

The Coloreel technology enables high-quality instant coloring of textile thread while in the textile production. The first product based on this technology is the Coloreel unit that works with any existing industrial embroidery machine. By instantly coloring a white base thread during the embroidery production, Coloreel enables complete freedom to create unique embroideries without any limitations in the use of colors. Adapting it to the spinnarets of an arachnid did pose some technical challenges.

“But, you know, where there’s a will there’s a way,” said the spider.

Based in the roof rafters of barn in the west of France, the spider hopes to have a festively colored web in place by the summer. “Bees and other more exotic insects can see color better than the kinds of bugs I usually eat,” said the spider. “I am hoping that, with a much more colorful web, I can catch much tastier prey.”

The spider is hoping that the Coloreel technology will someday include colors in the UV range. “That’s really where all the action is when it comes to a lot of insect vision.” 

 

 

 

This special report is brought to you by WhatTheyThink's editoral team as part our on-going live April Fools Day coverage. Subscribe for your annual dose of breaking of the news.

 

Discussion

By Bruce Richardson on Apr 01, 2019

Good one, April Fools!

 

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