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H&S Graphics Seeks to Eliminate Chemistry from the Pressroom

Wednesday, November 14, 2007

Press release from the issuing company

Lodi, New Jersey - November 2007 - H&S Graphics, which for three years has been building its reputation as an "Environmentally Friendlier" printer, has been making good on its promise to continue to reduce its environmental footprint while maintaining the highest quality in offset and digital printing. As a result, the 21-year-old company was recently recognized by Agfa Graphics by being the inaugural recipient of its Environmental Recognition Award.
Among the environmental initiatives at H&S are the use of chemistry-free printing plates, a program that recycles 99% of all paper and 100% of all aluminum plates, the use of zero V.O.C. (volatile organic compound) inks, and the continued testing of emerging technologies that promise to eliminate the vast majority of chemicals used in the pressroom.
"H&S has truly embraced the concept of sustainability and has continued to work toward greener processes from front to end. Once we started to recognize how we can reduce our environmental footprint without affecting quality and price, we were hooked on the idea," said John A. Santangelo, executive vice president, sales & marketing. "Based on our success, we launched an ad campaign via direct mail and magazines for two reasons: one, it promotes our environmental initiatives and gives us a competitive edge, and two, it may entice others in business and industry to reach the same kind of environmental goals."
H&S also launched a pilot program this month called "Grow Your Next Print Project" in which the company purchases new trees on behalf of clients who place orders through the month of November. Ponderosa pine trees, purchased through the begreennow.com website, will be planted in Kootenai National Forest in Montana as part of a reforestation project, following major forest fires there in 2000.
"You have to stay up with technology in this business," Santangelo added. "Things change very quickly. But you can't ignore the craftsmanship and art that goes into putting ink on paper, and more than ever, you can't ignore the footprint that printing leaves on our environment. We are working very hard to address that issue through everything we do."




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