Log In | Become a Member | Contact Us


Leading printing executives into the future

Connect on Twitter | Facebook | LinkedIn

Featured:     Economics Update Webinar     SGIA Expo     Graph Expo     European Coverage     Production Inkjet Analysis

NAPL Releases Blue Book for Smaller Printers

Thursday, March 22, 2001

Press release from the issuing company

3/22/01 - Smaller printers can find a wealth of information to help them understand their costs and price services competitively yet profitably. NAPL has completely revamped its Budgeted Hourly Cost Studies for Printing Operations Up to 20 Employees  (a.k.a., “The Small Printer Blue Book”). The “new” Blue Book offers information on the complete range of equipment used most frequently by smaller shops. One copy of the Blue Book is sent free to NAPL members upon request as a benefit of membership; additional copies are available to members for $65 each. Non-Members may purchase the Cost Study for $125. Orders can be placed via phone at (800) 642-6275; fax at (201) 634-0328; or e-mail at orders@napl.org. Please be sure to mention Product Code NB107. Simultaneously, NAPL announced that its series of Budgeted Hourly Cost Rates will be available online in PDF format, to members only. “Blue Books” are available online now to members to provide them with the added convenience and easy accessibility of electronic publishing. Frequently, smaller printers (like many larger ones as well) believe they should compete based on price. This can lead to a dangerous spiral of de-escalating price wars that cut deeply into a company’s profits. In fact, Andrew Paparozzi, NAPL Vice President and Chief Economist, advises printers not to compete on price. “Marketing is a combination of product, promotion, and price setting,” commented Paparozzi. “I would caution anyone against competing on price. It’s a no-win situation that can easily spiral out of control.” Budgeted Hourly Cost Rates help companies become competitive by allowing them accurately to determine how much it costs to run their specific equipment. If a company appears to be “working hard but not making any money,” hourly cost rates will pinpoint why profits are lagging.

 

 

SHARE

Email Icon Email

Print Icon Print

Become a Member

Join the thousands of printing executives who are already part of the WhatTheyThink Community.

Copyright © 2016 WhatTheyThink. All Rights Reserved