Log In | Become a Member | Contact Us

Market Intelligence for Printing and Publishing

Connect on Twitter | Facebook | LinkedIn

Featured:     European Coverage     Production Inkjet Analysis

Mark Levenson of Sage gives a buyer's perspective on offset versus digital

Published on December 4, 2012

Mark Levenson, Manager of US Manufacturing at Sage, talks to Cary Sherburne about the mix of digital versus offset in their print buys and what is important to him as a buyer of print.

Cary Sherburne: Hi, I’m Cary Sherburne, Senior Editor at WhatTheyThink, and I’m here with Mark Levenson, who’s the manager of US Manufacturing and Composition for Sage, and you guys are in the educational publishing business, right?

Mark Levenson: We are.

Cary Sherburne: So you buy a lot of printing.

Mark Levenson: We do buy a lot of printing.

Cary Sherburne: So, obviously, book printing has been one of the areas that’s migrated – is migrating pretty quickly to digital because of the high production of value inkjet as well as the requirement for shorter runs, right?

Mark Levenson: Right.

Cary Sherburne: So how are you seeing that play out in your business? I mean, do you have an idea – a rough idea of what gets printed offset versus what – percentage wise – versus what gets printed digital today, and where do you see that going?

Mark Levenson: It really depends on the quantity. I mean, it used to be that – you know, large runs and then you’d warehouse. But unfortunately if you don’t sell the books, then those are being recycled. So, therefore, we are lowering our quantities, whether it’s run digital or if it’s run to tradition; whatever the best fit for our quantities.

Cary Sherburne: And I know that it’s really important to you personally to stay up with the technology so that you kinda know what the possibilities are, right?

Mark Levenson: Right.

Cary Sherburne: But, in the end, do you really care? Do you kind of leave the decision up to your printing partner as to where they run?

Mark Levenson: Right. Well as long as the price is there, if the quality is there – the quality is very important. You can’t show somebody one thing and then give them something less afterwards, but, yeah, so it’s whatever’s the best fit.

Cary Sherburne: Yeah, and then also on the backend, on finishing, there’s a lot happening there in terms of the binding, right?

Mark Levenson: Right, which is great because that’s kind of where the bottleneck is, is in the production, we find. You know, we’ve also – we’ve reduced our production schedules down, and with these automated binding lines, you know they’re – the printing companies are able to even provide shorter schedules.

Cary Sherburne: Yeah. That’s great. That’s great. I know that, for example, companies like Muller Martini have just made huge strides in the automation.

Mark Levenson: Absolutely.

Cary Sherburne: You know, and I was talking recently with the product folks over there and I understand that, you know they’ve – a lot of the finishing companies are designing machines that can be used in-line but also near-line, off-line, right?

Mark Levenson: Right.

Cary Sherburne: So you can have stuff going in but at the same time you can be feeding it in from another device.

Mark Levenson: Definitely productive.

Cary Sherburne: Takes away the whole argument, doesn’t it? Near-line, off-line. So, well, that’s great ‘cause it’s always great to hear the buyer’s perspective on this thing.

Mark Levenson: Right. Absolutely. Any time.

Cary Sherburne: Thank you.

Email Icon Email         


Post a Comment

To post a comment Log In or Become a Member, doing so is simple and free



Recent Videos


Video preview: The Largest Printers in 1992. Where Are They Now?

The Largest Printers in 1992. Where Are They Now?

Published: October 21, 2016

Frank found a list of the largest printers from 1992. It documents the significant changes in the industry through merger, acquisition, and bankruptcy.


Video preview: To Inkjet Or Not? The thINK Conference helps in the decision process

To Inkjet Or Not? The thINK Conference helps in the decision process

Published: October 20, 2016

Jen Mitchell, Marketing Director at Harding Poorman, talks about the value of the thINK conference in terms of staying abreast of industry developments and being able to network with peers. The company has not yet invested in inkjet and views the thINK platform as an excellent part of the education and due diligence process.


Video preview: interlinkONE CEO John Foley Highlights Opportunities in the Association Market

interlinkONE CEO John Foley Highlights Opportunities in the Association Market

Published: October 19, 2016

John Foley, CEO of interlinkONE, talks with Senior Editor Cary Sherburne about the opportunities for printing firms in the association market, helping associations with strategic marketing plans, printed materials, multi-channel and more. "They are starving for this help," he says.


Video preview: thINK

thINK "Beyond the Box" in Production Inkjet

Published: October 18, 2016

Mark DeBoer, Director of Customer Experience at Darwill and thINK conference chair, talks about the maturation of the conversation about production inkjet "beyond the box." He sees more emphasis on data at the thINK conference, as an example, "stretching our imaginations as to what is possible with data." He also touches on the advances that have taken place in finishing for production inkjet.


Video preview: The Past, Present, and Future of thINK and Inkjet Technologies

The Past, Present, and Future of thINK and Inkjet Technologies

Published: October 16, 2016

Bob Radzis, Chief Customer Officer at SG360 and a founding member of the thINK community, discusses this year's conference and how he foresees a bright future ahead.


Video preview: Two Sides Survey Reflects High Levels of Consumer Acceptance Relative to Paper Use

Two Sides Survey Reflects High Levels of Consumer Acceptance Relative to Paper Use

Published: October 14, 2016

Phil Riebel, President of Two Sides North America, shares the results of a global survey designed to understand how consumers value paper. 88% of respondents in the U.S. felt it was acceptable to use trees from well managed forests to make lumber for construction or pulp for paper for printing, reflecting that their primary concern is that the industry does things responsibly. Watch the video for more details, including changes in messaging about paper from Starbucks.


View More Videos


Become a Member

Join the thousands of printing executives who are already part of the WhatTheyThink Community.

Copyright © 2016 WhatTheyThink. All Rights Reserved