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Patrice Aurenty of Sun Chemical on PantoneLIVE

Published on October 15, 2012

Patrice Aurenty, Business Leader at Sun Chemical, talks to Cary Sherburne about Sun's involvement in PantoneLIVE and their interest in ensuring consistent color for their customers.

Cary Sherburne: Hi, I’m Cary Sherburne, Senior Editor at WhatTheyThink.com. And I’m here with Patrice Aurenty who is a Business Leader Color Management at Sun Chemical, welcome.

Patrice Aurenty: Hi Cary, nice to meet you.

Cary Sherburne: We’re here today to talk a little bit about PantoneLIVE. And maybe you could tell us a little bit about what that is, and why Sun Chemical is involved with Pantone in this project.

Patrice Aurenty: Sure. Well PantoneLIVE is a very exciting step forward for brand color management. And Sun Chemical, as a leader in ink manufacturing, is extremely interested into getting color right for our customer, but also our customer customers which are the proud owners. So we’ve been in this business of color management for a long several number of years. And have been developing some technology and some colors for achieving right color real colors in the real substrates process. And PantoneLIVE is exactly what needs to be done to actually getting color consistent across a workflow.

Cary Sherburne: So PantoneLIVE is a cloud-based application. Can you tell me a little bit about what, I mean, who participates in PantoneLIVE?

Patrice Aurenty: The whole idea about PantoneLIVE is to get the real colors in the clouds, accessible by anyone in the workflow. So being from a designer to a printing press, or pre-press persons, or ink manufacturers, everyone all gets the same color data so that at the end the printing product will really look exactly what the designer was looking for.

Cary Sherburne: So the design intent is there throughout the supply chain.

Patrice Aurenty: Absolutely.

Cary Sherburne: So, as I understand it, the spectral values of the color are in the database, and then those are adjusted depending on what the printing process or the sub straight is going to be. Or if it’s a screen.

Patrice Aurenty: Exactly right. And spectrally is a right keywords here. This is a DNA of the color that we’re talking about. Spectrally is exactly this. And what we’ve done at Sun Chemical, is we’ve really put all those colors onto the real printing substrates with real processes. So it’s digital colors in the cloud, but they’re not coming from the cloud, they’re coming from real things.

Cary Sherburne: Right, right.

Patrice Aurenty: And this is what’s making the difference, whereas any other color matching systems today.

Cary Sherburne: And give me an example, maybe a good customer example. Somebody like Heinz that you’ve been working with.

Patrice Aurenty: Sure, Heinz has been a very interesting brand that we’ve been working with Pantone on for the last few months. And we’ve basically helped Heinz getting their Heinz blue for Heinz Beans in the U.K. exactly the same on four different sub straights, being flexible, being a label, being cartonboard. Just by applying the exact PantoneLIVE concepts from the beginning to the end. And at the end, we get the color right everywhere, which is, of course, a big value for the brand.

Cary Sherburne: And also at the same time, saving them time and money.

Patrice Aurenty: It’s exactly right. By having the right target you don’t have to rework the color all the time. You first target the real colors, the spectral value, and at the end of the press you have very minimal room for change, because basically everything is already done.

Cary Sherburne: Right, right. Great, well thank you very much for sharing.

Patrice Aurenty: Thank you.

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