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Southwest Software Announces Name Change To Southwest Colorscience, Inc.

Wednesday, January 07, 2004

Press release from the issuing company

Austin, Texas—(January 6, 2004) Southwest Software, Inc. announced that the company name has changed to Southwest ColorScience, Inc. The company is a fifteen-year industry innovator in device calibration and color control software for the printing industry. “We have deep roots in color science, and our name change reflects not only the type of projects we are now undertaking but also the evolution of the entire industry,” said Tom Burns, president of Southwest ColorScience. “Our products, as well as the new Southwest ColorScience name, have followed a paradigm shift within the printing industry as it moves from one of graphic arts to one of graphic science with increased connectivity.” Founded in 1989 in Austin, Texas, Southwest’s original products included color calibration utilities for monitors, scanners, copiers, proofers, inkjet printers, imagesetters, and platesetters. Products included Southwest’s Color Encore line of utilities as well as the Kodak Precision line. Southwest has private-labeled its calibration products to Kodak KPG, Canon, Minolta/QMS, and co-branded with 3M and AGFA. The company holds five patents on its calibration processes and has licensed its calibration patents to Kodak and Heidelberg. As the printing industry increasingly relies on digital processes for its production, the industry is moving more to a digital manufacturing process and away from its history as a craft and art industry. Southwest has changed its focus from calibration utilities to process control systems that track color between plant and customer. “Our products combine the accuracy of manufacturing process control with the science of spectrophotometry to develop end-to-end control for monitors, inkjet proofers, platesetters, and presses, and to significantly cut cycle time and consumable costs for our customers,” says Jim Burns, the company’s vice president of engineering. “Our name change more accurately reflects the type of business we do today.”

 

 

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