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Kodaks Monthly Tech Brief: Unclear Images Do Not Communicate

Wednesday, September 26, 2001

Press release from the issuing company

ROCHESTER, N.Y.- Sept. 25, 2001--Eastman Kodak Company's Monthly Tech Brief demonstrates the importance of image clarity as pictures become a bigger part of our daily communications. Unclear images don't communicate. Whether it's an image displayed as a poster in a backlit display, or a picture on a handheld digital device, Kodak scientists are applying their expertise to the convergence of imaging science and information technology to make the infoimaging experience more rewarding and the communications more effective. OLED: Improving the Performance and Lifetime of Display Materials Since Kodak Research Scientists Ching Tang and Steve Van Slyke published their discovery of OLED in 1987, more than 80 organizations--companies and universities--around the world have explored the potential of this technology. One focus of their efforts has been improving the basic OLED materials to achieve a broader color gamut and longer-lived displays. To meet these needs, Kodak's development teams have worked with materials scientists to commercialize a new generation of OLED materials that will boost lifetimes, increase luminance efficiency, and enhance colors. To find out more, click http://www.kodak.com/go/research Managing Light: New Day/Night Digital Display Material Works Two Ways Sometimes, you can have it all. We all know that light hits a surface and either passes through it or reflects off of it. At Kodak, scientists and product development engineers have created a new material that does both. Kodak Professional's new day/night digital display material manages the flow of light so that a single display can be both transmissive, allowing a backlight to shine through the material at night, or reflective, letting the same display appear like a photographic print when in sunlight. To find out how one image can communicate in both night and day, click http://www.kodak.com/go/research

 

 

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