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Adobe InDesign Speeds Publishing Of The San Francisco Examiner

Tuesday, May 22, 2001

Press release from the issuing company

SAN JOSE, Calif., (May 21, 2001) (Nasdaq: ADBE)--Adobe Systems Incorporated, today announced that the San Francisco Examiner has standardized on Adobe(r) InDesign(tm), an advanced page layout program, to help streamline its daily design and publishing operations. The award-winning newspaper deployed Adobe InDesign as part of an end-to-end database publishing system, called Jazbox, from Harris Publishing, a leading provider of cross media systems for newspapers, magazines and corporate publishers. San Francisco Examiner staff use the JazBox editor to write and edit stories that are ported easily to Adobe InDesign, which design staff and production artists use to paginate and prepare pages for printing. The InDesign files, including stories, photos, and graphics, are managed within the Jazbox system. Finished pages are output directly to platform- and application-independent Adobe Portable Document Format (PDF) files and sent via e-mail to the newspaper's offsite printing facility. "Adobe InDesign is a powerful application that combines ease of use with the design tools required for producing visually rich and detailed pages," says Angela Fang, vice president of technology at the San Francisco Examiner. "We were able to deploy Harris Jazbox, train staff on InDesign, and now use the system to create a newspaper of exceptional quality." Unprecedented Creativity, Productivity The tight integration of Adobe InDesign with Adobe Photoshop(r) allows Examiner staff to crop and edit photos easily; shared commands between the two applications also enable designers to leverage their experiences with one program on the other. The ease of using Adobe InDesign and its excellent typography controls, including the ability to color text or treat text as an art object, helps the staff rapidly create bright, compelling pages. "Creating visually rich pages is simpler in InDesign than it is in other layout applications," says Grady Cooper, director of product management for Harris Publishing. "Because it incorporates basic design tools from Adobe Illustrator and image management utilities from Adobe Photoshop, Examiner staff have tremendous flexibility in how they approach their layouts. Also, the ability to output InDesign files directly to Adobe PDF gives the Examiner a reliable, cost-effective way to deliver the newspaper to the printer."




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