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The Shapes of Things to Come: Direct-to-Object Printing Bridges the Gap Between Industrial and Commercial

New systems are emerging that can print directly onto three-dimensional objects, especially cups, glasses, and bottles, to serve what is emerging as a lucrative promotional drinkware market. In this feature, Richard Romano looks at direct-to-object offerings from Xerox, Inkcups, and Engineered Printing Solutions.

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About Richard Romano

Richard Romano is Managing Editor of WhatTheyThink | Printing News & Wide-Format & Signage.  He curates the Wide Format section on WhatTheyThink.com. He has been writing about the graphic communications industry for more than 25 years. He is the author or coauthor of more than half a dozen books on printing technology and business. His most recent book is “Beyond Paper: An Interactive Guide to Wide-Format and Specialty Printing.

Discussion

By Steven Calov on Mar 06, 2018

Heidelberg offers similar equipment in this Direct to Object printing with the Omnifire 250 and Omnifire 1000. The Omnifire 250 can print on round and cylindrical items with quick changeover holders with a 4 axis robotic arm. The Omnifire 1000 is a 6 axis robotic arm to print on all other shapes and sizes.

If you have a chance, please visit our web site at https://news.heidelbergusa.com/omnifire/ On the site you can find articles, brochures and video explaining the technology.

 

By Chris Lynn on Mar 06, 2018

The article did not mention one of the main challenges of this field - surface treatment to ensue good ink adhesion and appearance on disparate substrates.

Also, a substantial proportion of the direct-to-object printing market requires custom-designed material-handling systems. Companies like Prototype & Production Systems, Inc (www.prototypesys.com) understand the ink-substrate issues, and make custom printers for specific requirements.

 

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