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At Last, Nano Is Now as Landa Nanographic Printing Presses Line up for Market Entry

The wait has been long, and the anticipation has been intense. But, Landa Digital Printing believes it can amply reward both with what it will debut at drupa 2016.

By Patrick Henry
Published: April 21, 2016

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Patrick Henry, Executive Editor for WhatTheyThink.com is also the director of Liberty or Death Communications, a consultancy specializing in research, education, promotional, and editorial support services for the printing and publishing industries.

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Discussion

By Gordon Pritchard on Apr 21, 2016

The description of gamuts compares Landa's 7/C process to ISO's 4/C process. How does the gamut of Landa's 4/C process compare to ISO's 4/C?
Can the nano printed material go into standard paper recycling systems? Can the presswork be de-inked?
Nano particles can pass through human skin. Are there any issues of toxicity? Special handling requirements etc?

 

By Patrick Henry on Apr 21, 2016

Gordon, those are excellent questions, and I'll follow them up in detail at drupa. Here are some brief answers quoted from the presentation materials we were given at the pre-drupa briefing:

• Landa CMYK covers 80% of the Pantone gamut: 30% wider than offset ISO.

• Nanographic prints are deinkable. Nanographic printing supports recyclable paper with no need for additional priming.

• Landa's statement on "Regulatory Status of Ink Production" is as follows:

"All substances used in our inks are obtained from large, well-known manufacturers. We make sure that all substances are registered in relevant inventories. (They) do not contain banned ingredients, such as CMR, GMO, heavy metals, animal content, toxins, etc."

• Nanography is said to comply with eight sets of European regulations for food contact (indirect). Food, healthcare, cosmetics, and personal care are among the markets being targeted for Nanographic printing.

 

By Gordon Pritchard on Apr 21, 2016

Thanks for that info. I haven't seen it presented anywhere else.
If Landa CMYK covers 80% of the Pantone gamut as stated it seems somewhat uneconomical to add 3 extended process colors, i.e. run a 7 color process to only get an extra 13%.
I suppose that there is a deltaE aspect to what Pantone colors can be simulated. I wonder what that is and how he's calculating it (dE76, 94, 2000, etc.)?
Based on my experience (published data) about 45% of Pantone's library is in gamut (< 3 dE*94) for conventional 4/C offset. A 7/C conventional offset process will achieve about 93% (< 3 dE*94) which, interestingly, is the same number that that Landa's process delivers.

 

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