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New words for a new print world

By Frank Romano
Published: May 22, 2012

The vocabulary of print is changing. Our language in the printing industry is now beset with many new concepts and technologies. We need a common lexicon to help define and communicate.

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Frank Romano has spent over 50 years in the printing and publishing industries. Many know him best as the editor of the International Paper Pocket Pal or from the hundreds of articles he has written for publications from North America and Europe to the Middle East to Asia and Australia.

He is the author of over 52 books, including the 10,000-term Encyclopedia of Graphic Communications (with Richard Romano), the standard reference in the field. His books on QuarkXPress, Adobe InDesign, and PDF workflow were among the first in their fields. He has authored most of the books on digital printing. One of his books is the 800-page textbook for Moscow State University.

He has founded eight publications, serving as publisher or editor for TypeWorld/Electronic Publishing (which ended in its 30th year of publication), Computer Artist, Color Publishing, The Typographer, EP&P, and both the NCPA and PrintRIT Journals. His columns appear monthly in the Digital Printing Report. He was the editor of the EDSF Report for 14 years.

Romano lectures extensively, having addressed virtually every club, association, group, and professional organization at one time or another. He is one of the industry's foremost keynote speakers.

He has consulted for major corporations, publishers, government, and other users of digital printing and publishing technology. He wrote the first report on on-demand digital printing in 1980 and ran the first conference on the subject in 1985. He has conceptualized many of the workflow and applications techniques of the industry and was the principal researcher on the landmark EDSF study, “Printing in the Age of the Web and Beyond.”

He has been quoted in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Times of London, USA Today, Business Week, Forbes, and many other newspapers and publications, as well as on TV and radio. 

He continues to teach courses at RIT and other universities and works with students on unique research projects.

Please offer your feedback to Frank. He can be reached at frank@whattheythink.com.

 

Discussion

By HENRY HUNT on May 22, 2012

Thanks Frank, On our Indigo Press we still tell clients it's ink as the device says press. We shy away from saying Electro Ink 4.0 as most of our United Nations Clients would not understand even if we stopped to explain the ink concentrate and mixing oil concept to them or they might think we were talking about software. As we are in Kenya our operators have adopted the term "juice" to describe the ink in the BID as the tanks do look like juice despensers. Maybe in America it could be called "Kool-Aid" unofficially.

 

By Thaddeus B Kubis on May 22, 2012

There is only one new word and that is PROFIT, printing is a PROFIT based business, everything else is secondary.

 

By Patricia Benhmida on May 22, 2012

People are starting to talk about their businesses differently.
I used to hear phrases like "Getting by "and "hanging on," a lot ---Not so much anymore.
"Getting by" has morphed into to a guarded, half-assed "...so far, so good."
I hear that a lot: ...so far, so good, and... we've really started to get busy lately, and...as god as my witness, I will never be that vulnerable again.
It seems like we're all now just beginning to unfurl. We're loosening up. We're delicate. But we have a clarity and a new reverence for what's important, like never before....

 

By Richard Shields on Dec 27, 2012

Value seems to be , at times, overshadowed by perceived profit or "savings". A true value proposition will survive time and change and you can call it a winning partnership.

 

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